My view ...

The private blog of Andy Prevost. My experiences, my words. On any topic ...
0

Fruit Smoothies

In early February (2018) I drove a few hundred kilometers to my brother-in-law's for his help. He's the great cook in the family and puts my barbeque skills to shame. It is quite clearly his domain.

When I decided to create my own recipe, I had some ideas. Ideas I just knew my brother-in-law, Barry, would likely enhance. He even had many of the ingredients I needed on hand.

We went out shopping the first day there. There were two classifications of meal replacement I wanted to make. The main one was chocolate based, the second was fruit based. Barry came up with an excellent suggestion: use frozen fruit. I was quite surprised to find out that frozen fruits actually cost less than fresh. I bought a 4-Berry bag. At 1.75 Kg, it only cost $10.97. At 140 grams per serving for my recipe, that yields a total of 12 ½ servings at a cost of about $0.88 cents per serving (for the frozen fruit, see below for the cost including all ingredients).

Fruit Smoothie, is based on these ingredients:

  • 140 g (1 cup) of frozen fruit
  • 2 ½ tbsp ground flaxseed
  • ⅓ tsp ceylon cinnamon
  • ⅓ tsp stevia
  • ⅙ tsp nutmeg

Mix this together to end up with a 300 ml drink (10 fl oz). Blend all the ingredients in a blender with 300 ml of water. Please use good water. The water I use is pH neutral (chlorine removed, hardness neutralized, and with all minerals intact).

You then have a ready-to-drink fruit smoothie drink with a hint of some nice cinnamon spicing.

Costs are considerably less than the commercial versions, plus use organic and fresh (frozen fresh) ingredients. The Fruit Smoothie version is is about $1.33 cents for the 300 ml dirnk.

Here's the nutition facts on the Fruit Smoothie:

The only change you might want to consider is to add the ceylon cinnamon and nutmeg after you pour the finished blend into a glass. The reason for that is for you to adjust the spices to your tastes. Just keep in mind that you might want to get used to a bit more cinnamon and nutmeg. Both are extremely friendly to glycemic control ...

Enjoy! 
Andy

PS. Note that the Dark Chocolate and Milk Chocolate meal replacement smoothies I refer to as "Diabetic-Friendly". The Dark Chocolate version contains only 0.5g of sugar in a 300ml drink. The Milk Chocolate verison contains 8.3g. This Fruit Smoothie has 8.5g which compares favourably with the Milk Chocolate version.

Comments: No comments yet

0

Meal Replacement Smoothies

I arise around 5 am. I am out of the house by 5:20 am. That means a quick "setup" and breakfast. For some time, I have been relying on Equate Diabetic Chocolate meal replacement drinks. At 237 ml (8 fl oz), it's an inexpensive way of getting nutrition and out the door quickly. These are the Walmart house brand. They retail for $6.47 for a six-pack. The two closest competitors (Boost, Glucerna) cost about $9.50 for a six-pack.

Walmart has some issues in keeping these in stock. It is fairly consistent now that Walmart will have these out of stock regularly. You cannot count on supply meeting your needs. To offset the issue, I have been collecting coupons for the two other competitors that brings the price down ... still not as inexpensive as the Equate brand, but acceptable.

For many months, I have had this desire to come up with my own recipe for a meal replacement drink. That's mainly for two reasons: 1) get better quality ingredients with no preservatives; and 2) to get the cost down even lower. There's a third reason too: most of the commercial products use sugar alcoholds and "sugar-free" ingredients that I find objectionable – if you drink more than one per meal, you will likely end up with diarrhea.

I have achieved both goals. The third is a non-issue with my recipes, I use stevia as the sweetener and absolutely no sugar-alcohols.

I came up with two recipes. Both share all ingredients except one: buttermilk powder is an extra in one of the recipes (makes it similar in taste to milk chocolate). 

The main one, Dark Chocolate, is based on these ingredients:

  • 2 ½ tbsp ground flaxseed
  • 1 ½ tbsp cocoa
  • ⅓ tsp ceylon cinnamon
  • ⅓ tsp stevia
  • ⅙ tsp nutmeg

The next recipe is the Milk Chocolate version. That is based on these ingredients:

  • 2 tbsp buttermilk powder
  • 1 tbsp ground flaxseed
  • ¾ tbsp cocoa
  • ⅓ tsp ceylon cinnamon
  • ⅓ tsp stevia
  • ⅙ tsp nutmeg

The instructions are the same for both, with one note at the bottom.

Mix this together to end up with a 300 ml drink (10 fl oz). To blend this without clumping and with a good consistency, boil one-third of the water and blend with the drink ingredients in a blender. Fill a measuring cup with ice cubes to the 600 ml balance of water needed and top it up to the 600 ml mark with cold running water. Add that to the blender and finish your mixing. And, please use good water. The water I use is pH neutral (chlorine removed, hardness neutralized, and with all minerals intact).

You then have a ready-to-drink chocolate meal replacement drink with a hint of some nice cinnamon spicing.

Costs are considerably less than the commercial versions, plus use organic and fresh ingredients. The Dark Chocolate version is is about $0.54 cents for the 300 ml dirnk. The Milk Chocolate version is about $0.62 cents for the 300 ml drink.

The only change you might want to consider is to add the ceylon cinnamon and nutmeg after you pour the finished blend into a glass. The reason for that is for you to adjust the spices to your tastes. Just keep in mind that you might want to get used to a bit more cinnamon and nutmeg. Both are extremely friendly to glycemic control ...

Enjoy!
Andy

PS. Here's the Nutrition Facts as best as I can figure them out:

I wanted all the ingredients to be "dry" with the exception of the water. That was so that I could prepare a bulk mix in advance without having to bring every container with me. Ingredients explained:

  1. Flaxseed. I use only ground flaxseed. For fiber and glycemic control. That is the only way to get the full benefit from the flaxseed. If it is whole, it will not provide any glycemic control (will not digest properly). I also chose ground flaxseed instead of chia seeds. Both are an excellent source of fiber. Chia is considerably more expensive and does not provide glycemic control.
  2. Cocoa. I just use the "no name" brand to keep costs down. My last purchase was 454 g (1 lb) for $5.47. Dutch processed with potassium carbonate.
  3. Ceylon Cinnamon. Also called "True Cinnamon". There are two types of cinnamon: ceylon and cassia. Cassia is the most common and widely available. It is also quite inexpensive. I had to order Ceylon Cinnamon through the internet. I did find out that unless it says "Ceylon Cinnamon" on the package, you will be getting the lower priced and lower quality cassia type. The cassia type has known irritants that have negative impact on liver and kidneys. The Ceylon type has better sweetness and taste (as well as a very nice aroma).
  4. Stevia. Be careful here. Read any label very carefully, most stevia products contain sugar alcohols – avoid. I pay a bit more and get mine from the health food store, look at th elabel and choose the one that is 100% pure stevia with NO other ingredients.
  5. Nutmet. This was a last minute addition to add a bit of a spicy taste to the chocolate. It's mainly for glycemic control.
  6. Buttermilk Powder. The main blend has a Dark Chocolate taste. I wanted to try to get to a bit more of a Milk Chocolate taste too. I tried different types of powdered milk (skim, whole milk) and found that the one that provided a taste closest to Milk Chocolate was the butter milk powder. The other distinct advantage of using buttermilk in the blend is that you can lower the cocoa powder and lower the flaxseed – and still end up with more fiber overall. If you are ok with lactose, try the Milk Chocolate recipe – otherwise stick to the Dark Chocolate.

Comments: No comments yet

0

Health changes

Not exactly changes, a progression. I no longer use insulin, and no longer need digestive enzymes. My A1C is 6.2 mmol/L (111.6 mg/dL).

I have reported on my health issues at  http://myhealth.aprevost.com/ for years. I no longer update it as often as I used to and no longer review any diabetic products. My entire goal these past two years has been to reverse Pancreatitis and reverse Type 2 Diabetes. And, it has to be in that order. The pancreas is responsible for making insulin. Insulin is needed to correct the diabetes.

My health website discusses several phases of my self-treatments to address Pancreatitis and Diabetes. Diabetes has always taken a back seat to pain management of pancreatitis. That pain is delibitating. Until I started my research to find an effective natural pain management system, I was in hospital on average every 2-6 weeks. The last time I went to hospital for unmanageable pain was January 26 2012. I recall leaving the hospital holding my wife's hand – we had been at the hospital for over 10 hours at that point, and nine of those hours were spent in agony awaiting pain relief. The downside of any chronic pain disease is that the medical profession treats sufferers like drug addicts chasing the next high by faking symptoms ... it didn't matter that I had a near full prescription pain pill bottle with me and a history of frequent visits, you are a pill chaser until proven otherwise. Well, I had enough. I walked out of those hospital doors and turned to my wife exclaiming that I would do whatever it took to never have to go back to hospital for pain issues again. That was January 26 2012 near 1.15 pm. And, I haven't been back.

A large part of my career involved marketing and substantial research to understand the buyer and the buying circumstances. Studying business plans and building a return on investment that made it a no-brainer to buy the products and services I represented. Intense research. What paid off in business also paid off in strategies to deal with my health. I found a number of ways of managing blood sugar levels. I also found an incredible way of dealing with the pain of pancreatitis. It's simple: pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. The pain is from the inflammation of the pancreas and surrounding tissue. At that point in time, my pancreas was extensively damaged and not producing much insulin and not producing digestive enzymes. The other major function of the pancreas is to produce bicarbonate. My pancreas wasn't producing any of that either. My research showed that sodium bicarbonate from external sources could help. I found a medical report that I read several times to understand this. The day I decided to try this was the day after a small fireplace fire at our house. We had managed to put the fire out – no damage in the house, but a bit of smoke smell. We used some baking soda from the cupboard to remove the smoke smell. The empty baking soda box was on the counter waiting to go to garbage. There was just enough baking soda left for one "dose" ... baking soda is sodium bicarbonate. 

Well it worked and with immediate effect. I felt the pain completely subside within seconds of drinking a 1/8 level teaspoon of baking soda. My next step was to jump in the car and go buy another box. Baking soda – sodium bicarbonate – has been a key part of my self-treatment ever since. I carry it with me now all the time. 

My self treatment Phase 1 and Phase 2 helped manage my blood sugar levels and eliminate pancreatic pain. 

Phase 3 is what brought it all back to normal. And, I do mean normal. From a high of 19.2 mmol/L, my A1C is now 6.2 mmol/L (111.6 mg/dL). That is only .3 from normal and I'll reach that within a few months. I no longer need insulin. I have lowered Metformin from 5 per day to 2 per day. 

To make this perfectly clear, this means my pancreas is once again producing insulin and once again producing digestive enzymes. This means Phase 3 has restored the functionality of my pancreas.

Questions and Answers:

  1. Will sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) help my pain? Yes, it will. This site gets about 2100 unique daily visitors. Most are family or sufferers of IBS, Collitis, Crohn's Disease, and other digestive issues. Many have GERD's / acid reflux. Many have arthritis. All share in that inflammation is the cause of their health problems and find some relief from the anti-inflammatory properties of baking soda.
  2. How much baking soda should I take? The maximum to take in any 24 hour period is 1 level teaspoon. It is recommended that you do not take that all at once, spread it out over the day with 1/8 level teaspoon eight times through the day. That levels out the effects without creating a roller-coaster type of effect.
  3. I need your Phase 3 right now. I'm tired of injecting insulin and taking enzymes to function ... Sorry, I do empathize with your situation. I created Phase 3 and used myself as a guinea pig. Since others have essentially "stolen" Phase 1 and Phase 2 to create commercial products without so much as a thank you to me, I refuse to share Phase 3. Phase 3 is complex, but based on a simple scientific phenomena. 

And, a video that explains how to reverse Type 2 Diabetes (from Purdue University).

Comments: No comments yet